Woman Trades Louis Vuitton Bag for the iPhone 5S

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Lisa Hoffman’s Tribute to Steve Jobs

Lisa Hoffman of Charleston, S.C. now represents a growing part of our society that is addicted to smart phones. Her decision last Friday to trade her Louis Vuitton handbag for a spot closer to the front of the line to buy the iPhone 5S shows how much values have changed. Having the newest  trendy smart phone may now be even more important than a few-thousand-dollar fashion accessory.

In the last week or so, there have been several high profile stories about how Americans are becoming more obsessed with their phones. Hoffman couldn’t help herself. She was fifth in line to buy the iPhone 5S at the King Street store in Charleston, S.C. An Apple store manager suddenly announced a limited supply of phones. Hoffman couldn’t stand the pressure.

There were two ladies in front of her in the line. She figured they might get the iPhone 5S instead of her. Hoffman then pulled one of the best moves ever. She swapped places with the ladies in front of her for a better chance of getting the newest iPhone. In exchange, the ladies wanted the popular handbag. Hoffman made the local news that night which got rolled out throughout the United States. CNET covered the event.

Many Americans are getting worried about how much their smart phone means to them. They can’t stop checking it. The addiction has gotten so bad that groups of friends are coming up with games to discourage each other from looking at their phones during get-togethers. Read about that here.

Finally, comedian Louis C.K. made big news on Conan last week when he talked about the impact of cellphones on kids today. Catch it on YouTube.

Here are a few of his words:

“Just because the other stupid kids have phones, doesn’t mean that, oh, my kid has to be stupid too. I think these things are toxic, especially for kids. It’s bad. They don’t look at people when they talk to them. They don’t build the empathy.

“Kids are mean. They look at a kid and they go, you’re fat. Then they see the kid’s face scrunch up and say, ooh, that doesn’t feel good. But when they write “they’re fat,” they go, hmm, that was fun. The thing is you need to build an ability to just be yourself and not be doing something. That’s what the phones are taking away.”